Archive for the ‘TBI’ Category

Most Common Signs of a TBI

TBI

A traumatic brain injury can have a serious impact on your well-being, which is why it’s important to be able to recognize the signs of a TBI.

Mild TBI

A mild TBI is the most common type of a brain injury. This is akin to a light concussion – considering that this type of TBI is not severe, it can sometimes go unnoticed for far too long. Some common symptoms include a headache, fatigue of any kind, memory loss, dizziness, loss of balance, or some type of emotional disturbance that is abnormal for you.

Severe TBI

When, on the other hand, it comes to a severe TBI, this is a bit different. Moderate to severe characteristics of a traumatic brain injury is more serious and can vary more widely. Symptoms can include (but are not limited to): serious speech and language issues, cognitive deficits, different physical or emotional changes, differences in social behavior and interaction, and any type of sensory difficulties.

If you notice a change in your physical, mental, or emotional state after an injury, it’s important to take care of this right away. See a doctor at your earliest convenience to ensure that you get the help you need and deserve. TBIs should be treated right away!

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about the most common signs of a TBI? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

5 Reasons to Seek Out a TBI Support Group

TBITraumatic brain injuries are a serious health problem in the population at large – each year, nearly 1.7 million people are estimated to be affected by brain injuries (whether traumatic or not). And yet, unfortunately, there’s still a dearth of collective knowledge, and even conversation, surrounding this issue. People simply don’t talk about it, and the media is even less inclined to focus on the true extent of brain injuries.

When such a large percentage of the population is affected with something so life-altering, it’s time to do something about it. It’s time to disseminate awareness and education amongst our communities – after all, chances are that you know and love someone who’s struggling with a traumatic brain injury (or TBI).

One of the best ways to become more aware and educated on the issues surrounding traumatic brain injuries is to join a support group! Here are the top five reasons to seek out a TBI support group.

  • Brain injuries can be inherently isolating, and it can help to have a community afterwards.
  • Family members and friends can become more educated about what the TBI survivor in their lives has gone through.
  • Education is a critical part of the advocacy process, by which survivors can build awareness and acceptance in their lives.
  • Building a support network is important during this time.
  • Knowledge is power!

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about the reasons to seek out a TBI support group? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

Neurologists, Physiatrists, and More: Understanding the Roles of Rehabilitation Specialist

brain injury supportAfter experiencing a traumatic brain injury, the last thing you want to do is have to figure out all the terminology that goes along with it — particularly when it comes to rehab specialists. Here, we’ve outline what exactly a rehabilitation specialist does:

People with disabilities, whether physical or emotional, often need a particular type of support to be able to live independently — particularly those people that have experienced a TBI. This is where rehabilitation counselors come in. They help individuals cope with the effects of their disabilities as they relate to independent living. Without the services of these counselors, many people who are quite capable of living on their own would instead be forced to live in some type of a care facility. Research has shown that when people can be supported to live independently they are far healthier, are less reliant on family caregivers, and are more productive members of society as a whole.

And, rehabilitation is a team effort. The team of traumatic brain injury rehabilitation specialists usually includes physiatrists, neurologists, rehabilitation nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychologists, social workers, recreational therapists, and case managers. This team seeks to reduce disability in certain areas that can crop up, post-TBI.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how to understand the roles of rehabilitation specialists? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

How to Look for Work After a TBI

TBIReturning to work after a traumatic brain injury can be daunting and incredibly challenging. TryMunity is here to help! Here are some tips for how to look for work after a TBI.

  • Help your union promote a “Return-to-Work” policy for injured workers.
  • Work with your doctors and your employer to prioritize tasks, timelines, hours of work, and even location of work, i.e., telecommute. Allow extra time for completion of tasks, and when necessary negotiate for additional time, and /or support services.
  • Familiarize yourself with your employer’s policies on rehabilitation, re-employment and assistance for job re-entry.
  • Federal law requires that disabled workers be given reasonable accommodations concerning re-employment.
  • Educate your employer concerning the types of accommodations you need to help make your return to work efficient, and productive for all parties.
  • Talk to your friends, family, and co-workers. Discuss the types of  support and assistance that they can offer to assist you in your return to work
  • If you are a member of a union, help them to help you. You can make a difference not only for yourself and your co-workers, but for future generations.
  • Work together and adhere to Occupational Health and Safety practices.
  • Make workplace safety foremost in the minds of your co-workers. Join with them in sticking to the practices.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how to look for work after a TBI? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

5 Things NOT to Say to Someone Recovering From a TBI

brain injury supportDo you know someone who has suffered from a traumatic brain injury? If so, it can be difficult to know what to say. However, here are five things NOT to say to someone who has been afflicted with a TBI:

  1. “Maybe you should be more active.” Often, especially in the days and weeks just after recovery, a person with a TBI may demonstrate signs of being sluggish and apathetic. But, this is far from being abnormal.
  2. “Maybe your problem is that you take too many medications.” Blaming anything on medications is never a good idea. Why? Because you’re not a doctor, and by blaming meds for anything, you could stop someone from taking an important drug prematurely.
  3. “I will do that for you.” Encouraging the TBI survivor in your life to do things on his or her own is crucial. Regaining independence is a vital part of the recovery process!
  4. “You should just be grateful that you’re alive.” Telling someone that they’re lucky to be alive and that they should just be grateful is not helpful — for anyone.
  5. “You seem perfectly okay to me.” There are many, many invisible signs of  the TBI recovery process. By telling someone they seem okay when they aren’t feeling that way will only lead to hurt feelings.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about things not to say to someone recovering from a TBI? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

Tips for Increasing Brain Injury Awareness in Your Community

How to Find TBI Groups in Your CommunityTraumatic brain injuries are a serious health concern. When such a large percentage of the population is affected with something so life-altering, it’s time to increase awareness in your community. Here are some of the best ways to spread TBI education, within your personal community:

Do Research Yourself. Educating yourself on the intricacies of traumatic brain injuries is an important first step. There are so many excellent TBI resources out there – here at TryMunity, we’ve included in-depth information on both traumatic and acquired brain injuries, as well as concussions.

Talk to TBI Survivors. Talking to TBI survivors on a personal level is crucial. This is the only way to gain an understanding of just how much brain injuries can affect people – including the people that we love. Talking to someone who’s experienced a TBI will help provide invaluable insight into this health issue, and will likely give you a more nuanced, empathic overall perspective of brain injuries.

Give Back. Donate to TBI causes, or volunteer your time with a reputable TBI organization. You could also donate to TryMunity today – your support will go towards raising awareness of this issue, and providing important support for families dealing with TBI.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how to increase brain injury awareness within your personal community? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance. We look forward to telling you more!

Avoiding Concussions During Spring Sports

Football InjurySpring sports season is here, and you know what that means – concussion season. Concussions are no fun, and they can also be life-threatening. This can be a scary risk associated with sports, but there are some ways to reduce your chances of getting concussed. Follow our tips for avoiding concussion during spring sports season:

  • Wear helmets and other protective headgear. When it comes to high-contact sports, there is no excuse for not wearing a helmet or other headgear, regardless of whether you are practicing or playing an actual game. You should also always close a chin strap if you are wearing a helmet.
  • Play by the rules. This one’s important! To ensure that you avoid concussions and other injuries, playing by the rules is essential – and could very well save your life.
  • Check the field or arena. If you’re playing a sport outdoors, checking over the field can be helpful. Why? Because, this way, you can spot uneven patches or holes in the field – both of which can be treacherous. Check the field to ensure that you reduce your risk of getting a concussion.
  • Wear the appropriate equipment. In addition to wearing a helmet, other protective gear is important, too. If your sport requires padding or other equipment, you should always wear this to avoid getting concussed.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how avoid concussions during spring sports season? If so, don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

Practical Ways to Find a TBI Support Network

Overcoming Adversity That Comes With TBIAre you or a loved one struggling with a traumatic brain injury? If so, one of the best things you can do is find a specialized support group, or network of people who are dealing with (or have dealt with) a TBI. Why? Because having a TBI can be an extremely isolating experience. It can be easy to lose sight of what’s important, and it can be easy to forget that there are other people out there going through the same things that you are. Finding a good TBI-specific support network will be a wonderful, healing experience for both the TBI survivor and his/her family and friends. Below, we’ve listed a couple ideas for practical ways to find a TBI support network:

Facebook. Or any social media, really. By reaching out on Facebook, you’re bound to find a host of great groups to join — either virtually or in person.

Meetups.com. This website is chock-full of all kinds of different “meet-up” groups (i.e. like-minded people who have formed a kind of club), so you’ll likely fund some great resources and groups here.

TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we’re proud to offer a widespread support network for TBI survivors and their families and friends. Consider joining us today!

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how to support a family that’s been affected by a TBI? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

 

5 Ways to Support a Family Affected by a TBI

TBIIf you know someone who’s been affected by a TBI, then you know that this can be a very difficult time – both for the TBI survivor, as well as his or her family members. You may be wondering how you can help (or if you can help, at all). First, the answer is YES – you can certainly do your part to help! Here are some helpful ways to support a family that has been affected by a traumatic brain injury:

  • Make food. Cooking and bringing food over to the family is always a great idea. There’s no better way to show you care than through homecooked food!
  • Read up on traumatic brain injuries. Another excellent way to support the family? Read up on what they’re going through!
  • Help them find a supportive community for TBI survivors. There are people out there experiencing the same challenges – help the family find their fellow TBI community.
  • Check in on them frequently. One of the best things you can do is to check in on the family from time to time, to let them know they aren’t forgotten.
  • Just show up. Sometimes, one of the best things we can do for loved ones that have been affected by a TBI is to simply show up.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about how to support a family that’s been affected by a TBI? Don’t hesitate to contact TryMunity. Here at TryMunity, we provide a vast, comprehensive web of resources for just that! We also have several support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you, and offer our assistance.

Top 5 Myths About TBIs

brain injury supportIf you or someone you love has been afflicted with a traumatic brain injury (or, TBI), then you know: there are several poorly-informed myths surrounding this type of injury. Here are the top 5:

  • If a person looks okay after he or she has been impaired, they must be okay. Wrong! It is very possible for a person who has just sustained a TBI to be walking around and talking to people, without realizing the extent of their injuries.
  • Mild TBIs are not very debilitating. Even those people who have mild TBIs may experience severe or long-lasting consequences, that run the gamut from physical symptoms to psychological consequences.
  • Recovery is a linear process. Not at all – recovery can be very messy, inconsistent, and those with TBIs may feel better or worse at different times throughout the recovery period. Recovery from a TBI does not follow a neat pattern. There is no timeframe or limit; each person’s recovery looks quite different. It’s true!
  • TBI’s only happen when someone gets knocked unconscious. Nope! Some people with TBI’s are only dazed for a few minutes or two, but they never get knocked unconscious.
  • Your IQ is affected by your traumatic brain injury. Wrong again – your IQ level is certainly not automatically affected by your TBI.

Join the TryMunity Community – We’re Here for You!

Do you have further questions about the many myths that surround traumatic brain injuries? At TryMunity, we provide a vast web of resources and support systems for those afflicted with a traumatic brain injury, or who know of someone who is. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have! Join the TryMunity community today, and take advantage of all that we offer. We’re always happy to speak with you and offer our assistance!