Archive for the ‘Other Brain Injuries’ Category

What is an Acquired Brain Injury?

brain injury supportThere are two conversations happening simultaneously in the brain injury community. The first and foremost conversation is obviously that of a traumatic brain injury. Mothers, fathers, siblings, and children are discussing what constitutes a TBI. However, the second dialogue is that of an ABI (Acquired Brain Injury). As these two injuries differ, we hope to clarify. Since TryMunity aims to be resource, we’ll present both types of injury – allowing you to determine which one you’ve suffered.

An Acquired Brain Injury is…

An acquired brain injury is the scenario in which your brain injury was not caused by a traumatic event. Experts often consider a huge difference between the two types of brain injuries because traumatic generally means the effect of trauma, where as acquired generally means brought on gradually. Some illnesses that can lead to an ABI include: stroke, loss of air to the brain, and other cerebral vascular accidents. Some accidents that can lead to a traumatic injury include external forces, such as a car crash, a gunshot to the body, or a traumatic fall. The fact of the matter is, an acquired brain injury is no less severe than a traumatic one. They both change lives, and they both deserve ample attention and research. They are just brought on by different catalysts.

ABI vs. TBI?

Some debates exist between ABIs and TBIs. It is often thought that the TBI can actually fall within the ABI category, but again, research doesn’t point that in any direction one way or another. Our suggestion for the debate is that it be done with. We suggest that all victims of brain injuries deserve care and proper support, and it doesn’t matter “how” the injury was brought on. Instead, the injury exists. That’s one of our philosophies: if the injury exists, we’re here to help you get through it.

TryMunity isn’t about division of injuries or weighing the severity of them, we are about connection and pushing forward the knowledge of brain injuries. Advocacy can only leap forward when we all work together. To join the TryMunity community visit us at community.trymunity.com.